Energy from waste

Waste Plastic to Diesel.


In September 2005 we were contracted by project proponents and investors from Victoria, Australia, to act as Independent Engineer for due-diligence in assessment of technology for converting waste plastic into liquid hydrocarbon fuels (gasoline and diesel).

This involved a visit to a working facility in South Korea, liaison with the technology developers in Beijing, China, and the preparation of a detailed report.

Our report table of contents:

  1. INTRODUCTION
  2. SUMMARY
  3. CONCLUSIONS & RECOMMENDATIONS
  4. TECHNICAL COMMENTS
    4.1 Inspection of plant in South Korea
    4.2 Type of plant offered to P-Fuel
    4.3 Other potential buyers
    4.4 Competing technology
    4.5 Detailed material balance
    4.6 Initial technical questions submitted to RoyCo
    4.7 Further questions submitted to RoyCo
    4.8 Difficulty in acquiring definitive data
    4.9 Areas requiring further clarification
    4.10 Areas of technical risk
  5. ECONOMIC EVALUATION  – 3000 tonnes/yr CAPACITY
    5.1 Introduction
    5.2 Case 1 assumptions
    5.3 Case 1 economic results
    5.4 More favourable design assumptions for 3,000 t/yr unit.
    5.5 Comments on variables affecting profitability.
    5.6 Project capital cost estimate
    5.7 Project operating costs
    5.8 Areas of commercial/contractual risk
    5.9 Commercial upside
  6. ECOMOMIC EVALUATION – 6,000 t/yr TARGET PLANT CAPACITY
    6.1 Introduction
    6.2 Economic evaluation cases at 6,000 t/yr throughput
    6.3 Case 1A economic results (conservative)
    6.4 Case 7A economic results (non-conservative)
    6.5 Sensitivity study for Case 1A (6,000 t/yr design case, conservative assumptions)
    6.6 Conclusions & recommendations
  7. COMPARISON WITH P-FUEL’S SIMPLEFIED ECONOMIC MODEL
  8. ATTACHMENTS

Our initial report was completed in January 2006, and updated in May 2007.  It provided the project developers with independent and reliable technical and economic information to assist their decision-making.

A final investment decision was made in 2009.  It was decided to install the plant in Scotland and not in Victoria as originally planned.  This was due to more favourable economic incentives in the U.K. and a better source of feedstock waste material.